Episode 80: The Real Student

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“Do you know what it means to learn? When you are really learning you are learning throughout your life and there is no one special teacher to learn from. Then everything teaches you--a deaf leaf, a bird in flight, a smell, a tear, the rich and the poor, those who are crying, the smile of a woman, the haughtiness of a man. You learn from everything, therefore there is no guide, no philosopher, no guru. Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning.” ~ Krishnamurti from Think on These Things

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The Real Student

“Do you know what it means to learn? When you are really learning you are learning throughout your life and there is no one special teacher to learn from. Then everything teaches you--a deaf leaf, a bird in flight, a smell, a tear, the rich and the poor, those who are crying, the smile of a woman, the haughtiness of a man. You learn from everything, therefore there is no guide, no philosopher, no guru. Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning.” ~ Krishnamurti from Think on These Things

Krishnamurti also says that “To be a real student is to learn all the time.”

Reminds me of Confucius. I don’t know how many times he referred to learning in his classic book, The Analects (see Notes), but it was a LOT. Things like this: “In a hamlet of ten households, there are bound to be those who are my equal in doing their best for others and in being trustworthy in what they say, but they are unlikely to be as eager to learn as I am.”

Plus: “Those who do not study are only cattle dressed up in men’s clothes.” And, “Even when walking in the company of two other men, I am bound to be able to learn from them. The good points of the one I copy; the bad points of the other I correct in myself.”

How about you? Are a “real student”?!? Can you alchemize EVERYTHING into an opportunity to learn? ESPECIALLY the challenging stuff? See if you can take what used to annoy you and just use it as fuel to deepen your practice. As Marcus Aurelius says (see Notes on Meditations): “So here is a rule to remember in future, when anything tempts you to feel bitter: not, ‘This is a misfortune,’ but ‘To bear this worthily is a good fortune.’”

Life is our classroom!!! Let’s get our wisdom on, yo! :)