Ethan Nichtern:

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Ethan Nichtern is a Buddhist meditation practitioner and teacher. His parents were both early students of the Buddhist pioneer Chogyam Trungpa. As a teenager, Ethan tried to rebel against his parents' tradition. Like most well-intentioned rebellions, it failed miserably. The practice of meditation kept proving its usefulness through pretty much every aspect of his life, especially those dark and crazy parts he would rather be left alone. He grew up in New York City and graduated from Brown University in 2000.

A poet and writer with both strong spiritual and political influences, Ethan is a featured performer in Sacred Slam, a performance series which brings together artists from different spiritual traditions. He is the author of the acclaimed book One City: A Declaration of Interdependence [link] and a forthcoming novel, The Last Year on the Island [link]. His writing has been featured in Tricycle Magazine and BuddhaDharma Magazine, Sentient City, Shambhala Sun, as well as other online publications.

Since 2002, Ethan has taught ongoing meditation and Buddhist studies classes and workshops around New York City, as well as at Northeast colleges and universities. Ethan loves teaching meditation to other people for two reasons. First, it makes him reconnect to being a student on a deeper and deeper level. Second, it seems to be helpful for just about everyone who tries it. Ethan has much gratitude for all his teachers (too many to mention) for being who they are, particularly Sakyong Mipham, who he quotes way too often.